Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior
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Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior by F. A. Albini

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Wildfires,
  • Winds

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementF.A. Albini, D.J. Latham, and R.G. Baughman
SeriesResearch paper INT -- 257
ContributionsLatham, Don J, Baughman, Robert G, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)
The Physical Object
Pagination19 p. :
Number of Pages19
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13605053M

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  Estimating windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior Item Preview Estimating windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior by Albini, F. A. (Frank A.) This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library. See also WorldCat (this item). Title. Estimating windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior / Related Titles. Series: USDA Forest Service research paper INT ; By. Albini, F. A. (Frank A.) Baughman, Robert G. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah) Type. Estimating upslope convective windspeeds for predicting wildland fire behavior / F.A. Albini, D.J. Latham, and R.G. : F. A. (Frank A.) Albini.   One of the factors that affect this phenomenon is terrain slope. This paper used a Computational Fluid Dynamic solver called FireFoam to evaluate the effect of terrain slope on fire-wind enhancement. The results revealed that the enhancement of wind velocity due to fire increases with an increase in terrain by: 2.

The 10% wind speed rule of thumb for estimating a wildfire’s forward rate of spread in forests and shrublands wildland fire behaviour on an operational basis have been MAPE increase d. INT-RP Predicting Behavior and Size of Crown Fires in the Northern Rocky Mountains INT-RP Relative Corrosivity of Currently Approved Wildland Fire Chemicals INT-RP Soil Disturbance Resulting From Skidding Logs on Granitic Soils in Central Idaho INT-RP   Downslope winds are very shallow and of a slower speed than upslope winds, generally mph. The cooled denser air is stable and the downslope flow, therefore, tends to be laminar. Valley Winds are similar to and linked with slope winds. Their development each day generally lags hours behind that of slope winds. Additional copies of this publication may be ordered from: The purpose of this appendix is to provide some basic fire behavior information that will enable a person with a moderate level of fire behavior training (S) to predict and calculate some basic elements of fire behavior and fire size.

In other words, the probability of ignition is the chance that the firebrand will cause an ignition when the right kind of firebrand lands on the right kind of fuel. Whether a wildland fire actually results from the ignition depends on the fire environment's ability to support and sustain burning. The standard to determine the fire resistance level of a construction element can also be found in AS [16], AS [17], AS [18] and AS [19] respectively, for. Chapter 7. CONVECTIVE WINDS. Winds of local origin—convective winds caused by local temperature differences—can be as important in fire behavior as the winds produced by the synoptic-scale pressure pattern. In many areas they are the predominant winds in that they overshadow the general Size: 1MB. bib1. F.A. Albini, D.J. Latham, R.G. Baughman, Estimating Upslope Convective Windspeeds for Predicting Wildland Fire Behavior, USDA Forest by: